The original Manenberg’s Jazz Café was established in Adderley Street on 4 December 1994, amidst the euphoria of South Africa’s new democracy.

From inception, it reflected the joy of the rainbow nation through many cultural lenses. This joy was vested in the prospect of a diverse, yetunited, nationhood.

Literally translated, Manenberg means “Man and Mountain”, but the symbolism goes beyond the affinity that the people of this City have had with its Mountain since time immemorial.

“Manenberg is Where it’s Happening” was also an anthem of the struggling black masses during the time of Apartheid. The recording was made in June 1974 in a studio in Cape Town against a backdrop of forced removals, as the Apartheid government finalized its destruction of District Six, and evicted Coloured families from their homes throughout the city.

Asked in an interview how the title came about, Abdullah Ibrahim said: “Because Basil Coetzee was from Manenberg – and for us Manenberg was just symbolic of the removal out of District Six, which is actually the removal of everybody from everywhere in the world, and Manenberg specifically because… it signifies it’s our music, and it’s our culture”

Manenberg’s Jazz Café represented authenticity that drew locals and tourists from around the world. Understandably, havingthis culture back in the City and Bay where it belonged resonated in many hearts. Denzel Washington, Collin Farrel, David Bowie were some of the international celebrities who visited the venue. Performances at the venue also included Kool and the Gang, Spirogyra, Oliver Mtukudsi, Miriam Makeba, HughMasekela, Ali Farka Touré and others from all over the world.

Manenberg’s Jazz Café was also a home away from home for politicians in the National Assembly. Cyril Ramaphosa once played the bongos on stage, while Ronnie Kasrils, Steve Tshwete, Trevor Manuel, Frene Ginwala and other members of cabinet were regulars at the venue.

Manenberg’s at The Camissa Courtyard re-opens its doors this weekend, exactly 20 years after its establishment. Situated at 96 Strand Street Cape Town, this time round the venue is set to be more than just a music venue.

Nestled in a quiet courtyard on a heritage site, the open air ambience is an inviting step out of the bustle of the City, where the music blends effortlessly with the trees and the palpable sense of history. The food reflects the culinary traditions of the City – expect a menu that includes the quintessential braai tradition alongside delectable curries and sea food.

Moreover, the venue is steeped in history; situated on one of the branches of the Camissa River that flows underground to the sea. This river defined the emotional and spiritual connection of the indigenous Khoi people with the area now known as Cape Town. Camissa, whichmeans “Place of Sweet Water,” was the original Khoi name for the City of Cape Town. The water from this river has its source in 25 springs on the slopes of theTable Mountain range, which still today produce high quality water.

Manenberg’s at the Camissa Courtyard will seek to deliver a world class, authentic musical and culinary experience that will beguile patrons; reclaiming the cultural, spiritual and emotional relationship between the indigenous Khoi and the land.

Part of the design (beyond the experience that the venue offers) is to play a lead role in advocating a name change from The City of Cape Town to the Camissa Metro. This will not be at the expense of the CBD’s identity – which should retain its name as Cape Town. Cape Town is, after all, a leading international tourism brand with a dependence on the tourismindustry.

It’s hoped that the Camissa Metro will lay the framework for the reclamation of identity and history of the people of thiscity; that the legacy of Slavery, Colonialism, Apartheid and Dispossession will be redressed as a result.

The founder of Manenberg’s Jazz Café, Clarence Ford, says “My business partner, Lovetta Bolters, and I are mindful of the challenges confronting us. Music – and jazz, specifically – is a difficult business in this City. We have some world class musicians in Cape Town, and the premium stage that we’ve created is intended to showcase them to a diverse audience.

Similarly we are disturbed by the levels of drug and alcohol abuse in this city. We are more than disturbed by the gangviolence killing young men in their prime. This endeavour is more than just a business; we believe that by embracing the indigenous names that our ancestors applied to this space, we’ll restore the reverence and spiritual significance our ancestors placed on it. This will go a long way in reconciling our history and reclaiming our souls.

Ours is a passionate, non-political, labour of true love. Join us as we reclaim the spiritual significance of our land anddestiny. As a symbolic token of our endeavor, white flags will be hung around the venue in solidarity with Bonteheuwel, Manenberg, Guguletu and Khayelitsha that are ravaged by drug and alcohol abuse and gangsterism.”

Manenberg’s at the Camissa Courtyard also features the Apartheid Museum’s Nelson Mandela exhibition. The exhibition provides great perspectives on one of Africa and the World’s greatest leaders.

As from this coming weekend The original Manenberg’s Jazz Café was established in Adderley Street on 4 December 1994, amidst the euphoria of South Africa’s new democracy.

From inception, it reflected the joy of the rainbow nation throughmany cultural lenses. This joy was vested in the prospect of a diverse, yetunited, nationhood.

Literally translated, Manenberg means “Man and Mountain”, but the symbolism goes beyond the affinity that the people of this City have had with its Mountain since time immemorial.

“Manenberg is Where it’s Happening” was also an anthem of the struggling black masses during the time of Apartheid. The recording was made in June 1974 in a studio in Cape Town against a backdrop of forced removals, as the Apartheid government finalized its destruction of District Six, and evicted Coloured families from their homes throughout the city.

Asked in an interview how the title came about, Abdullah Ibrahim said: “Because Basil Coetzee was from Manenberg – and for us Manenberg was just symbolic of the removal out of District Six, which is actually the removal of everybody from everywhere in the world, and Manenberg specifically because… it signifies it’s our music, and it’s our culture”

Manenberg’s Jazz Café represented authenticity that drew locals and tourists from around the world. Understandably, havingthis culture back in the City and Bay where it belonged resonated in many hearts. Denzel Washington, Collin Farrel, David Bowie were some of the international celebrities who visited the venue. Performances at the venue also included Kool and the Gang, Spirogyra, Oliver Mtukudsi, Miriam Makeba, HughMasekela, Ali Farka Touré and others from all over the world.

Manenberg’s Jazz Café was also a home away from home for politicians in the National Assembly. Cyril Ramaphosa once played the bongos on stage, while Ronnie Kasrils, Steve Tshwete, Trevor Manuel, Frene Ginwala and other members of cabinet were regulars at the venue.

Manenberg’s at The Camissa Courtyard re-opens its doors this weekend, exactly 20 years after its establishment. Situated at 96 Strand Street Cape Town, this time round the venue is set to be more than just a music venue.

Nestled in a quiet courtyard on a heritage site, the open air ambience is an inviting step out of the bustle of the City, where the music blends effortlessly with the trees and the palpable sense of history. The food reflects the culinary traditions of the City – expect a menu that includes the quintessential braai tradition alongside delectable curries and sea food.

Moreover, the venue is steeped in history; situated on one of the branches of the Camissa River that flows underground to the sea. This river defined the emotional and spiritual connection of the indigenous Khoi people with the area now known as Cape Town. Camissa, whichmeans “Place of Sweet Water,” was the original Khoi name for the City of Cape Town. The water from this river has its source in 25 springs on the slopes of the Table Mountain range, which still today produce high quality water.

Manenberg’s at the Camissa Courtyard will seek to deliver a world class, authentic musical and culinary experience that will beguile patrons; reclaiming the cultural, spiritual and emotional relationship between the indigenous Khoi and the land.

Part of the design (beyond the experience that the venue offers) is to play a lead role in advocating a name change from The City of Cape Town to the Camissa Metro. This will not be at the expense of the CBD’s identity – which should retain its name as Cape Town. Cape Town is, after all, a leading international tourism brand with a dependence on the tourismindustry.

It’s hoped that the Camissa Metro will lay the framework for the reclamation of identity and history of the people of thiscity; that the legacy of Slavery, Colonialism, Apartheid and Dispossession will be redressed as a result.

The founder of Manenberg’s Jazz Café, Clarence Ford, says “My business partner, Lovetta Bolters, and I are mindful of the challenges confronting us. Music – and jazz, specifically – is a difficult business in this City. We have some world class musicians in Cape Town, and the premium stage that we’ve created is intended to showcase them to a diverse audience.

Similarly we are disturbed by the levels of drug and alcohol abuse in this city. We are more than disturbed by the gangviolence killing young men in their prime. This endeavour is more than just a business; we believe that by embracing the indigenous names that our ancestors applied to this space, we’ll restore the reverence and spiritual significance our ancestors placed on it. This will go a long way in reconciling our history and reclaiming our souls.

Ours is a passionate, non-political, labour of true love. Join us as we reclaim the spiritual significance of our land anddestiny. As a symbolic token of our endeavor, white flags will be hung around the venue in solidarity with Bonteheuwel, Manenberg, Guguletu and Khayelitsha that are ravaged by drug and alcohol abuse and gangsterism.”

Manenberg’s at the Camissa Courtyard also features the Apartheid Museum’s Nelson Mandela exhibition. The exhibition provides great perspectives on one of Africa and the World’s greatest leaders.

 

As from this weekend Manenberg will be open from 09h30 with a daytime and evening menu. Live music is scheduled 7 nights a week. Join the Facebook Group Manenberg’s @ the Camissa Courtyard for regular programme and other updates – or book your space on 021 8395126.

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